White Star Line's Last Voyage - Oceanliners and Classic Cruise Ships Magazine

White Star Line’s Last Voyage

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On 11 November 1960, Britannic (1929) left Liverpool on her final voyage to New York. The trip marked the last paid-passenger journey for any ocean liner built for White Star Line. Although now sailing for Cunard Line, Britannic was still resplendent in her White Star Line livery: buff funnels topped in black and a black hull accented by a gold band. She was still flying her White Star Line burgee, although since 1950 positioned below the Cunard house flag.

Britannic (1929) was the first British liner to use a diesel motor rather than steam engines.

Britannic (1929) was the first British liner to use a diesel motor rather than steam engines.

Britannic marked a milestone in ocean liner development by being the first British liner to use a diesel motor rather than one or more steam engines for propulsion. Britannic’s diesel technology allowed the vessel to sport shorter, squatter funnels than a typical steamship, giving her a modern appearance that would soon be mimicked by many other liners.

In the years leading up to World War II, Britannic served as a Liverpool-New York transatlantic liner in the summer and as a Caribbean cruise ship in the winter. Britannic was a troopship during the war, carrying over 180,000 troops and traveling a total of 376,000 miles.

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